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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 16, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at 5. an "unprecedented solution" for the border between northern ireland and the republic after brexit is proposed by the government. ministers publish a position paper — it emphasises the need to avoid a hard border, and protect the good friday agreement and common travel area. we'll have the latest, with reaction from the irish border and from brussels — and we'll talk to the centre for cross—border studies. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. theresa may criticises donald trump for failing to single out white supremacists for criticism, following the violence in virginia at the weekend. we've proscribed certain far right groups here in the united kingdom. and there's no equivalence, i see no equivalence, between those who propound fascist views and those who oppose them. and i think it is important for all those in positions of responsibility to condemn far right views wherever we hear them. the labour mp
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the labourmp sarah the labour mp sarah champion has resigned from her front bench role and apologise for what she said was and apologise for what she said was a poor choice of words in a newspaper article about child abuse. at least 600 people are still missing after the mudslide in sierra leone. the president of the country says entire communities have been wiped out. unemployment falls to the lowest level since 1975 — but average earnings are still lagging behind inflation. hms queen elizabeth — the royal navy‘s biggest ever warship — sails into her new berth in portsmouth. mps will look again at plans to silence big ben forfour years — after the prime minister intervenes. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at five. the government says there must
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be an ‘unprecedented solution‘ for the border between northern ireland and the republic, after britain leaves the eu. ministers have published their proposals on the future relationship with ireland, and have called for a seamless border — so that people and goods can continue to move across freely — which protects the good friday agreement. the irish government says the paper is timely and helpful, but critics say the plans lack credible detail. our ireland correspondent chris buckler reports. for more than 300 miles, crossing fields and bridges, roads and rivers, there is a political dividing line on the island of ireland. but it is a border that cannot be seen, and many want it to stay that way. soft toys and cushions are the latest protest against a hard brexit. they have been placed here between belcoo in northern ireland and blacklion in the republic, by people who do not want their towns divided by barriers once one is inside the eu and the other is outside.
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i cross this border quite easily 15, 20 times a day, moving goods sometimes, sometimes just to manage staff, meet people, whatever is involved in daily work. if there is any sort of checks that slow that down or anything else, it is going to create a lot of logistical difficulties. customs posts were once a feature of the irish border, but these huts lie derelict now and the british government has made it clear it wants them to stay that way. its position paper calls for no new buildings or barriers at the border, and repeats calls for a temporary customs union with the eu, followed by a deal that would avoid the need for customs checks for the billions of pounds in trade carried up and down these roads every year. as we look forward to brexit, of course, we do want to ensure that we do not see a return to the borders of the past, we don't see a return to the hard border, and that we are able to ensure that the crucial flow of goods and people between northern ireland
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and the republic of ireland is able to continue in the future. we are quite clear and i think everyone is clear on both sides in northern ireland that there must be no hard border. there never has been a hard, physical border. though clearly there have been controls in the past. nobody wants to see a return to that, that would just damage the peace process. today's document also calls for the protection of the common travel area, which allows people to travel between the uk and ireland without passport controls. crossing time today is two hours and 25 minutes... and the government says it has ruled out the idea of a customs border being placed between the islands of ireland and britain as unconstitutional and not economically viable. this position paper repeats phrases that have been used by government ministers countless times in recent months. like there should be no return to the borders of the past, there should be a frictionless, seamless border. but there remain real questions about how that can happen, particularly as some within the eu have described the idea
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of an invisible border as fantasy. it is important to say this, this is welcome today. we have more clarity than we had yesterday in relation to the british government's approach to brexit as it relates to northern ireland and ireland, but there are still unanswered questions and we will be constructive in terms of trying to find answers to those questions, but also firm. yet, there is a will to find solutions. because tied up with the politics and practicalities are concerns about the potential impact to peace and prosperity at this, what is currently the softest of borders. in a moment we can talk to our reporter adam fleming in brussels but first let's cross to our ireland correspondent chris page, who is on the irish border at narrow water in county down. is itfairto
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is it fair to say this is a pretty ambitious document?” is it fair to say this is a pretty ambitious document? i think it is ambitious document? i think it is ambitious in its aspirations and ambitious in its aspirations and ambitious in its ideas and certainly it says all the right things. if you listen to the eu or the uk they are both saying similar things about the irish border. they do not want it to bea irish border. they do not want it to be a hard border, they do not want barriers, they wanted to be as open as it is now an practically bad is needed because even looking behind me, one side where i'm standing is northern ireland and the other side of the water, and you could probably swim that easily, that is the republic of ireland. putting in place some kind of barriers is not realistic. that is what all sides say. but you still get the impression that they're fumbling around trying to work out exactly how this would work vertically on theissue how this would work vertically on the issue of customs. particularly on the issue of migration. the common travel area has been in place
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for almost 100 years. moving between the uk and ireland is something taken for granted without passport checks. customs go up and down the busy roads between north and south. yet at the same time if one state is inside the eu and the other outside, it poses real concern. 0n highly monitored diet, that is the issue. the british government has spoken time and time again about how they think technology could be the answer in part. i spoke to the irish foreign minister couple of hours ago and he made clear to me that they have doubts about technology being the answer. this is more complicated, it is more tricky and ultimately they have not come up with the detailed yet that will work out exactly what is going to happen to this order. let's had to brussels and adam fleming. what did they make of these proposals where you are because we know this is one of the top issues every time those
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negotiators say that this must be sorted. so the european commission is glad that the uk is publishing these position papers, and giving more clarity on a range of issues about brexit. but today a spokesperson repeated what michel barnier the chief eu negotiator a lwa ys barnier the chief eu negotiator always says about ireland, he says he wants to come to a big political agreement that guarantees the continuity of the good friday agreement which guarantees peace on the island of ireland. he says there must be some big agreement about that before you then start to talk about technical details like customs and goods and border posts or the absence of them. so that still stands. what i'm struck by in the paperfrom stands. what i'm struck by in the paper from the government today, it is full of language and examples designed to reassure the eu about its big concerns. so the first thing the paper says uk side is they want to the good friday agreement. then
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they talk about the common travel area and said that it lets irish and british citizens travel between each other‘s countries freely, the uk says that is enshrined in an eu treaty. so if that was allowed to continue after brexit that would be breaching eu law. eu states are concerned about the republic becoming a back door to cheaper imports for a broad and so the uk is offering to design a new customs partnership to prevent that an equaliser food and agricultural safety sta nda rds equaliser food and agricultural safety standards to prevent that as well. of course making the case is not the same as the eu being convinced by the case. and privately there are many people still saying there are many people still saying the uk is asking for too much. for 110w the uk is asking for too much. for now thank you very much. and more about that story after half—past. donald trump is facing a fresh wave of criticism after he again blamed both sides for the violence in cha rlottesville,
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virginia on saturday, which left one protester dead and others injured. in a carefully scripted statement on monday, he had condemned white supremacists and far right groups. but last night he said left—wing protestors were also to blame. that led to george bush senior and george w bush to release a statement saying, america must always reject racial bigotry, anti—semitism, and hatred in all forms. as we pray for cha rlottesville hatred in all forms. as we pray for charlottesville we are reminded of the fundamental truths recorded by the fundamental truths recorded by the city ‘s most prominent citizen in the declaration of independence. we are all created equal and endowed by our creator with unalienable rights. the statement goes on to say, we know these truths to be everlasting because we have seen the decency and greatness of our country. that statement follows
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comments made earlier today from our prime minister theresa may. she was unusually critical of the comments made by donald trump. as i made clear at the weekend following the horrendous scenes in charlottesville, horrendous scenes in cha rlottesville, i horrendous scenes in charlottesville, i applaud the racism, hatred and violence that we have seen portrayed by these groups. united kingdom has taken action to banfar right united kingdom has taken action to ban far right groups here, without prescribed certain the far right groups here in the uk. and there's no equivalence, i see no equivalence between those who propound fascist views and those who oppose them. i think it is important for all those in positions of responsibility to condemn far right views wherever we hear them. well the prime minister's comments follow the president's heated news conference in trump tower yesterday evening. having previously condemned the actions of far—right groups in charlottesville, mr trump appeared to revert to his original stance on the violence, by saying both sides were to blame. what about them alt left, they came
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charging an attempt to right. they came charging with clubs in their hands. do they had any problem, i think they do. as far as i'm concerned that was a horrible, horrible bay. wait a minute, i'm not finished. that was a horrible day. i watched those closely, more closely than you people watched it. and you have, you had a group on one side that was bad and you had a group on the other side that was also very violent. and nobody wants to say that but i will say it right now. do you think what you call the alt left is the same as neo—nazis? those people, all of those people... excuse me, i have condemned neo—nazis. i have condemned many different groups. but not all of those people were neo—nazis, believe me. not all of those people were white
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supremacists by any stretch. you call the alt left and white supremacists on the same moral plane. what i'm saying is this, you had a group on one side and a group on the other and they came at cheddar with clubs and it was vicious and horrible. it was a horrible thing to watch. but there is another side, there was a group on this site, you could call them the left, you just call them the left, that came violently attacking the other group. so say what you wa nt the other group. so say what you want but that is the way it is. and that was prompted such a strong reaction including that statement from former presidents george bush senior and george w bush. well right 110w senior and george w bush. well right now a memorial service is
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underweight for the young woman who lost your life when it are ploughed into a lost your life when it are ploughed intoa group lost your life when it are ploughed into a group of counter protesters but she was injune that demonstration. and this memorial service is going on at the moment. and her father has service is going on at the moment. and herfather has been service is going on at the moment. and her father has been talking to the crowd. he urged forgiveness. she loved people. she wanted equality. and in this issue of the day of her passing she wanted to put down hate. and for my part we just need to stop all this stuff and just forgive each other. i think that is what the lord would want us to do. just love one another. i came here today and i was overwhelmed, i was overwhelmed... at
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the rainbow of colours in this room. that is how heather was. it did not matter who you wear or where you we re matter who you wear or where you were from. if she loved you that was it. you were stuck. so for that i'm truly proud of daughter. the father of heather heyer speaking to the crowd there at that memorial service thatis crowd there at that memorial service that is continuing in cha rlottesville that is continuing in charlottesville virginia. we will stay with these images from that memorial service. let's speak to our correspondent gary 0'donoghue who's in washington. these images, the sobering reminder of what went on at the weekend and a very striking just in the last little while that strong statement coming through from the former president. your thoughts about that? as you say watching heather heyer, watching her father, it
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as you say watching heather heyer, watching herfather, it is as you say watching heather heyer, watching her father, it is difficult not to be overwhelmed by that. the family have paid tribute to her and his words will echo and resonate around today, i'm certain of that. of course this statement by the only two former leading republican presidents, father and son, very strong i think. not naming donald trump but clearly we know where this is aimed at. invoking thomas jefferson, the author of the declaration of independence, the third american president, talk about people being made equal, created equal, unalienable rights. in a sense throwing the declaration back in the face of this current president. that is very strong stuff. and they join president. that is very strong stuff. and theyjoin a raft of other republicans who to some extent have come out and condemned the president
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for apparently was seemingly drawn that moral equivalence between the sets of demonstrators on saturday. and i think this is becoming a very difficult moment for this president. we have been here before, many times in their last six months. but this feels different in some ways because the racial divide in america, the racial problem in america is not new, it goes back to the civil war really. but what has been different in recent times is that there has been innocent no mainstream endorsement of that. the far right have been largely isolated. they have been largely isolated. they have caused trouble, continued to cause trouble but never had never felt they've had some kind of official endorsement. now donald trump says he rejects neo—nazis, white supremacists, the kkk. that is not what they think he is doing.
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they thanked him, the kkk thanked him for his statements yesterday. when he had that shouting match with the press. and that will embolden i think those elements and there are 110w think those elements and there are now promises of more right wing gatherings in places like kentucky quite soon. gary for now, thank you. we can speak to taylor griffin, who was a strategist in the george w bush administration, and with john mccain's presidential campaign. good evening. you worked for one of the man who hasjust good evening. you worked for one of the man who has just issued this very strong statement. do you feel that this incident and the reaction to it would be some sort of turning point in this administration?” think absolutely. there is a big risk that we are seeing a moment
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when the donald trump presidency becomes a failing presidency. he has failed to grasp the fundamental question being asked in the national conversation and this is not about who is more violent, it is a fundamental moral question about who we wa nt fundamental moral question about who we want to be as a nation right now. and it is a question about hatred, about racial divisions. and he has refused to answer it in a way that satisfies anyone. i think this really is a troubled moment for his presidency. a troubling moment you say but then to move things on, what has to happen next because there has been a degree of condemnation from some fairly senior republicans and then of course in the last hour that strong statement from two former presidents. but practically speaking what would have to happen question mark ——? what would have to happen question mark --? i think as far as whether he is doing a good job as president,
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the only way to answer that question is in the next election in 2020. there are issues going on with russia and all that kind of thing, but i think practically the governing of this country will move to the other side of pennsylvania avenue to the congress. and the president largely gets bypassed and is the spectator. effectively at the top of the government but ending up asa top of the government but ending up as a spectator to help the country is governed. so he would be bypassed in terms of legislation you mean, but we know it would appear that nothing is going to stop him tweeting and he is still the president and there are plenty who still support him and say we elected him and he should govern. that is exactly right and that is a problem because the president has a
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constitutional job to because the president has a constitutionaljob to do as the president of the united states. the executive departments must do their jobs and they are led by very able people. but as far as being a leader in pushing forward an agenda and doing all the things that he promised to do as a candidate i think he will have a lot of trouble doing that unless he can find some way to re—establish the moral and political leadership that has been dwindling every day since he became president. we will talk again i'm sure. thank you for now. this is bbc news at five — the headlines. the government says it wants no border posts between northern ireland and the republic of ireland in its new position paper about brexit. donald trump faces criticism from within his own party after once more blaming both sides for violence in charlottesville during which one person was killed. here the labour mp sarah champion
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has resigned from front bench role and apologise for what she says was and apologise for what she says was an extremely poor choice of words in an extremely poor choice of words in a newspaper article about child abuse. and coming up, with the return as james bond? yes. daniel craig confirms he will play 007 just one more time. and in sport celtic are bidding to reach the group stages of the champions league tonight, they host astana in their first leg of the qualifier at celtic park. they knocked out because exta nt park. they knocked out because extant champions in qualifying last season. and in cricket mark stoneman is the only change in the england tea m is the only change in the england team to face west indies in the first day night test at edgbaston tomorrow. and jo pavey wants to defend her european 10,000 metres title next year a month before her 45t h title next year a month before her 45th birthday. she missed the world
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championships in london through injury but says she has no plans to retire. more on those stories after half—past. labour mp sarah champion has offered to resign from her role as shadow secretary of state for women and equalities — ‘extremely poor choice of words‘ in a newspaper article. ms champion cited her column for the sun last friday as the reason for her apology and resignation. emma vardy is with us. plenty of people may not even know what she has written so could you explain the background. sarah champion cause particular offence with the words that she wrote in the article for
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the sun newspaper in which she said britain is a problem with british pakistani men raping and exploiting white girls. as you said she was reacting to the conviction in newcastle of a group of mostly asian men of exploiting and abusing young girl. that was the latest court case ina girl. that was the latest court case in a series of cases in which we have seen men convicted of exploiting young girls in which the perpetrators within these gangs have been of asian origin. so she‘s not the first person to comment on this at all, a number of people have raised questions over whether the ethnicity of these perpetrators has in any way been a barrier for police and social services to finding out the truth. but that was a point that sarah champion was addressing but the way in which she expressed this for many people went too far. it was seen as too much of a sweeping generalisation and it caused deep offence. now the pressure increased on her as criticism grew, she try to
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distance herself from watching written in the sun newspaper by saying that the opening paragraphs had been edited. but some of the nuance in detail had been stripped out. but nonetheless the pressure did not decrease and therefore she has now stepped down with this statement in the past hour saying i apologise for the offence caused by the extremely poor choice of words in the sun newspaper article on friday but up i‘m concerned that my continued position in the shadow cabinet would distract from the crucial issues around child protection. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has accepted her resignation, he also issued a short statement to say thank you to sarah for her work in the shadow cabinet and said he looks forward to working together with her in future. of course we have seen many comments about the issue of grooming gangs who have been convicted in court cases over the past few years. but for many sarah champion, her words just went
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too far and now we‘ve seen her resignation because of that. some of the other stories making bbc news at five. west midlands police have arrested the brother of the man accused of kidnapping the model, chloe ayling. michal konrad herba was arrested in tividale, in the west midlands, and will appear in court tomorrow. he is the brother of the suspect lu kasz pawel herba, who is being held by italian police after ms ayling was allegedly kidnapped in milan. the long running bin strike in birmingham has been suspended after a breakthrough in talks between the city council and the unite union. the strike began injune in a row over working conditions and pay. birmingham city council, which is using agency staff and contractors to try to clear the backlog, had accused refuse workers of holding the city to ransom and said the dispute was costing £40,000 a day. police are investigating a robbery at the knightsbridge showroom of the jewellers boodles this morning. in footage of the incident — caught on camera by a witness — smoke can be seen emerging from the shop before a number of suspects make off carrying bags
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of stolen goods on mopeds. they used hammers to smash their way through counter displays. boodles, which specialises in diamonds, say noone was hurt in the robbery. a man has pleaded not guilty to stealing from victims of the manchester arena attack on the night of the explosion. chris parker — who was homeless at the time — is accused of taking a purse from a woman whose granddaughter died in the attack, and of stealing a mobile phone from a teenage girl. the 33—year—old was remanded in custody and will next appear month. the manchester arena will open for the first time since the bombing in may, with a benefit concert to honour those killed in the attack. a ‘we are manchester‘ concert will be staged on 9th september, with mancunian singers taking part, including noel gallagher‘s high flying birds, the courteeners and blossoms. all money raised will go towards establishing a permanent memorial to the victims. dan whitworth is outside the arena
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and has the details. watmore have the organisers said? as you say no gallagher and his band the high flying birds will headline the high flying birds will headline the we are manchester concert marking the official reopening of manchester arena just behind me on the 9th of september. it was one of the 9th of september. it was one of the oasis tracks. blog back in anger that became an anthem of unity for the city in the days and weeks and indeed months following the horrific events of the 22nd of may. another few bands have been added to the bill. manchester bands blossom, rick astley a nd bill. manchester bands blossom, rick astley and poet tony walsh. tickets go on sale tomorrow, they will cost around £30 with organisers saying any money raised will go towards funding a permanent memorialfor the
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victims of that attack. was the organisers say the terrible events of that might will never be forgotten, the reopening of this 21,000 capacity arena is an important step, an important symbol in the resilience of the city and its defiance in the face of terror. thank you. now look at the weather prospects in a moment. after months of speculation, daniel craig has confirmed he will return as james bond, just one more time. daniel craig told us television that the next film though — due out in 2019 — would definitely be his last. daniel craig, will you return as james bond? yes. cheering. thanks so much, daniel craig, everybody! he says he‘s only doing one more. he
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says! let‘s get the weather for you now. for your eyes only, the spectre of rain from the west. the rain band has been very slow and some damp weather beginning to edging to parts of england and wales. this is what the rain band looks like in parts of ireland. this band of rain sweeping itself eastwards, turning heavy for a time but easing off. temperatures 13—16dc. this band of rain will be quite difficult to clear, cloudy into the afternoon. a mix of sunshine and
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showers moving in. it will feel warm here than it has done, highs of 19 in glasgow and 20 in belfast. that‘s your weather. thank you, chris. this is bbc news. i‘m jane hill. the headlines. the government has published its blueprint for a "frictionless" border between northern ireland and the republic after brexit, ruling out new customs posts and surveillance technology. president trump continues to face criticism for his response to the violence at a far—right rally in virginia, in which he condemned both sides. theresa may insists there‘s "no equivalence" between promoters of fascism and those who oppose them. we have prescribed certain far right groups in the united kingdom, and i
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see no equivalents in those who compound fascist views and those who condemn them. the labour mp sarah champion resigns from herfront bench role, and apologises for what she says was an extremely poor choice of words in a newspaper article about child abuse. at least 600 people are still missing after the sierra leone mudslide. the country‘s president says entire communities have been wiped out. new figures show unemployment falls to its lowest level since 1975, but average earnings are still lagging behind inflation. the royal navy‘s largest ever warship the aircraft carrier, hms queen elizabeth sails into her home port of portsmouth for the first time. ...and mps will look again at plans to silence big ben for 4 years, after the prime minister intervened in the row.
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there are concerns about how long the repairs should take. it's it‘s time for all your latest sport now. celtic are bidding to reach the stages of the champions league when they host astana this week. they are ona they host astana this week. they are on a great run, unbeaten in 50 games domestic league and are just two games away from a lucrative place in the premiership club competition. games away from a lucrative place in the premiership club competitionm you think too much about the consequence of it, then you have to look on it as another game. the only way you can get through it is by staying focused, staying very much in the present and looking at what
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you had to do. arsenal's manager says they have not made any progress yet on a contract for alexis sanchez. the chilean international who has less than a year to go on his contract has been linked away to the club but the manager says he is still wanting to finish his contract. most of the time, if you can find a good compromise it is better. but in this case, i think i would prioritise the fact that we would prioritise the fact that we would look at the sportive side. the iceland international who passed a
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medical earlier today scored nine goals and had 13 assists at swansea last year to avoid relegation. his tra nsfer last year to avoid relegation. his transfer beats the previous everton record where they paid 13,000,004 lukaku. record where they paid 13 million lukaku. we need a player to replace lukaku. he‘s had a good season in swansea and he is, in my opinion in his position, one of the best in the premier league. joe wicks confirmed that toby rowland jones will keep his place in the england side. chris wood is sidelined with injury and
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mason crane also. keating jennings is replaced. the players are talking about playing under the lights in the first time in the uk. it may not have as much as an impact as it did in australia and also with a temperature being slightly different as well. it's interesting that we are giving it an opportunity to work here in england and it will be interesting to see how it is viewed among people and fans across the country. katarina matthews has been called up to replace patterson. the 47—year—old has played in nine cups between 1998 and 2015. paterson has been receiving treatment for a back
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injury. the event takes place in iowa, for friday to sunday. nishikori has had to withdraw from the masters in saint natty —— cincinnati after damage to his tendons. he is forced to sit out the rest of the year. you can keep up with all our stories on our website and we‘ll have more for you in sportsday at 6:30pm. more now on the publication of a paper which says the government does not want border posts between northern ireland and the republic after brexit. the document says ministers back a "seamless" border so people and goods can move freely. but critics maintain there are no credible details on how an open border could be maintained. chris morris from our reality check team has been looking in more detail at why the irish border
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matters so much. the government‘s proposals promise to uphold the good friday agreement in full and to maintain the common travel area, which allows irish and uk citizens in ireland to travel freely, but the determination to avoid a hard border after brexit is at the heart of the matter. that‘s because when brexit happens, the uk will suddenly have a major land border with the eu. here it is, between northern ireland and the republic of ireland, running for 310 miles. during the troubles, with tensions on the border there were just 20 official crossings between northern ireland and the republic. the british army shut down, spiked or cratered the rest. but following the good friday agreement, there has been considerable change and now there are more than 260 public roads that cross the border. the centre for cross border studies has estimated that between 23 and 30,000 people cross the border daily for work. while, each month, around 170,000 lorries and 1.85 million cars are recorded crossing the border,
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which means that every year 31% of northern ireland‘s exports go to the republic, and 27% of its imports come from the republic. so there‘s a lot at stake. delays could lead to huge costs for business, plus there‘s the risk of tax evasion and various types of smuggling, both of goods and people. but above and beyond that, there are massive political issues. creating any kind of hard border would be incredibly sensitive politically and could do serious damage to the peace process. so what are the possible solutions? remember, in an ideal world for the uk government there would still be no customs border at all, even after brexit. but if the eu won‘t agree to that, part of the proposal argues for a wide—ranging exemption under which small and medium—sized businesses will not have to comply
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with any new customs tariffs, along with a new pre—cleared ‘trusted trader‘ arrangement for larger companies. this goes well beyond arrangements at other external borders of the customs union. there are places that operate with a pretty light—touch, but there aren‘t invisible borders with no physical infrastructure at all. so what the uk wants on the irish border is unprecedented and complicated by history. there‘s also the acknowledgement that regulations on things like food safety would have to be pretty much identical on both sides of the border. raising questions about what kind of political compromises might have to be made to get a deal done. meanwhile sinn fein‘s brexit spokesman, david cullinane, said the idea of an open border on the island of ireland was ‘nonsense‘. let‘s be clear. this british government is attempting to take
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the north of ireland out of the european union, out of the customs union and out of the eu single market against the will of the majority of people in the north who voted to remain in the european union. and the notion that the north of ireland will come out of the eu and that you will have an open border is a nonsense. it‘s the stuff of fantasy. what we will have is a border between northern ireland and the eu and the rest of britain. and that is completely unacceptable that you would have an eu frontier on the island of ireland. it is also incompatible with many arrangements within the good friday agreement, so this with respect is very bad for ireland. there is no good brexit for ireland, no good eu frontier, and to suggest you can have a frictionless border and there will be no restrictions on the movement of goods or services or people if you have an eu frontier on the island of ireland is a nonsense. that‘s from sinn fein and we hope to hear from the dup shortly. joining us from our belfast
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newsroom to explain more about whether the government‘s proposals could work is anthony spares, deputy director at the independent think tank the center for cross border studies. what do you make of this? we welcome it in the first instance and we welcome them the interest from the government in keeping a recognition of the importance of the good friday agreement. however, looking at the paper in its totality and its conclusions, we note that the government says that it wants in 0ctober two principal elements, the maintenance of the common travel area and also to continue the peace programme. now, the first element,
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the common travel agreement, it does relate to some other issues, namely the rights of eu citizens in the uk and vice versa which will have to be negotiated by the uk and the eu and that seems to have been set aside. there seems to be a singular focus in terms of the peace programme, and other programmes supported by the eu that help northern ireland, including other cross—border programmes, and again, the uk government seems to have wanted to separate this away from its financial settlements which is also a priority for the eu. we would argue here that we really need to look at the good friday agreement in a different way, in a way that
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offers us a frame work to deal with problems going forward. there are people in brussels saying that the notion of an invisible order is a fa ntasy. notion of an invisible order is a fantasy. the word fantasy was actually used, and i appreciate you welcome the publication of this, but is itfairto welcome the publication of this, but is it fair to say it is hugely ambitious? yes, i would agree with you. ambition is something we need from all sides, but what it lacks is concrete details in terms of the operation of the border, in terms of the crossing of goods and notjust between northern ireland and the republic of island, we need to think of the good friday agreement in its totality, and the rest of the uk. it's totality, and the rest of the uk. it‘s coming to a solution that would
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secure cross—border trading of goods and a solution that doesn‘t need to harden the existing border in ireland, nor should it be a solution that creates a new border between the entire island of ireland. coming up the entire island of ireland. coming up with concrete ideas to resolve these issues... i think this paper is lacking in detail and it seems to be trying to advance the negotiations in terms of wanting the eu to start to discuss issues that the commission has set out which could only be discussed following 0ctober could only be discussed following october and once the commission decides enough progress has been made on issues such as eu citizens‘s rights in the uk. until progress is made on those things, we can‘t
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progress or go down the right that the uk government seems to be attempting to go down, in other words getting the eu to discuss future trading arrangements. thank you very much for your time this evening, anthony. thank you for joining us from belfast. the government says it does not want any border posts between northern ireland and the republic of ireland in its new position paper on brexit. donald trump faces criticism from within his own party after once more blaming both sides for violence in charlottesville during which one person was killed. here, the labour mp sarah champion resigns from her front bench role, and apologises for what she says was an extremely poor choice of words in a newspaper article about child abuse. at least 600 people are believed
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to be missing after a mudslide engulfed dozens of homes on the outskirts of the capital of sierra leone, freetown. the country‘s president has declared seven days of mourning and said entire communities have been wiped out. the united nations is preparing to deal with the outbreak of diseases such as cholera and typhoid. the families of those that have been buried by the mudslide have gathered here at the main mortuary in freetown. since we‘ve been here, a fleet of ambulances have arrived. the stench of corpses is overpowering. workers in the mortuary say there are too many bodies, they need to bury them as quickly as possible. there‘s concerns about a possible outbreak of typhoid or cholera. there is a real sense of grief as well as tension. people want more to be done. they feel that the authorities haven‘t been quick enough in terms of the rescue operation. this is a nation in mourning. they‘ve declared a week of national mourning here in sierra leone. there has been a lot of criticism
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of the authorities because many families believe that this was a preventable disaster. the biggest warship ever built for the royal navy the aircraft carrier, hms queen elizabeth has sailed into her home port of portsmouth for the first time after sea trials. she weighs 65 thousand tonnes and cost more than three billion pounds. well in portsmouth this morning, huge crowds started gathering before sunrise to watch the queen elizabeth arrive. jonathan beale is there. 0ur correspondent is there. our correspondent is there. just to give you a sense of scale, from the
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top of the master the bottom of the keel is taller than nelson‘s column. it's keel is taller than nelson‘s column. it‘s longer than 900 feet which is longer than the houses of parliament. in theory, it should be able to sail anywhere in the world, but all of this does not come cheap. the royal navy has never had a ship of this size before. a day to remember that the crowds who got up early to see her in and even a touch of the nostalgia when britain ruled the waves. it put shoe above everybody else really. -- it puts you. the crew had been testing
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the system is for the past few weeks and she is the most expensive warship ever built in the uk. a symbol of power and pride but the navy but also for the whole nation to. it puts the armed forces right backin to. it puts the armed forces right back in the premier league. for a globalfacing back in the premier league. for a global facing country, and back in the premier league. for a globalfacing country, and island nation dependent on c trade, why would you not want a strong royal navy? this is a big moment the royal navy, its largest warship entering portsmouth that the first time. it‘s the most expensive warship and it still needs jets and other warships to protect her, at a time when the ministry of defence is having to save billions of pounds. this former officer says the navy is struggling to crew 19 ships already. currently
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there are not enough submarines. this is the worry, having delivered the platform itself, if we cannot protect it how can we use it? on her first visit on board, the prime minister says this warship represents britain‘s global power. the new f 55 will cost 100 million each. it will air ready —— there are fears it will already cost a lot to maintain. we are getting breaking news about an it attack on the scottish parliament. it involves hackers systematically having to
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crack passwords and users have been informed that repeated attempts to log into their computers could see them locked out. this could go on for several days. this is what officials are telling us and the attack is thought to be similar to one on westminster injune and that one on westminster injune and that one lasted for four days. that‘s what we‘re hearing regarding the cyber attack on the scottish parliament. the number of people out of work is now its lowest since 1975. uk unemployment fell slightly in the three months tojune, bringing the jobless rate down to 4.4%. the office for national statistics also reported a slight rise in average earnings. but there was a slowdown in the number of foreign—born workers joining the british workforce. 0ur economics correspondent, andy verity, reports. for eight years now,
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the british economy has been a job creation machine and figures today showed little signs of that slowing down. low unemployment means a tight labour market so it is harder for places like this mode of cycle manufacturer to get the staff they need. the upside for workers is pay rises could improve in the second quarter of the year. the downside is companies with full order books cannot go order books cannot grow as fast as they might. at the moment you cannot drive growth as fast as we are able, not because of a lack of orders or finance but people. it is super—frustrating that we cannot get skilled staff to come in and take advantage of the orders we have or prototype design work for the next models and next generation of nortons. low unemployment makes economists worried that workers will bid up their paper pushing up inflation. so far about that fear of wage price spiral is far from realised. we hope that means we can run this
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economy permanently with lower unemployment and let‘s hope unemployment keeps falling which i think it will until wage inflation starts to pick up. it's it‘s mystified us economists. the figures today tell us something interesting about the supply of workers from abroad. over the past 20 years this yellow line shows you the number of workers from abroad from outside the eu. the blue line is the number of workers from within the eu so sharply increasing over the past seven years. then this number is the increase in non—uk nationals working here in the first quarter of the year, up 207,000 but then in the second quarter of the year it was up by much less, 109,000. a sharp slowdown.
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until the financial crisis investment in skills and machinery meant each year each worker could produce more per hour. that growth in productivity meant that companies could afford bigger pay rises. but today we have learned productivity fell for the second quarter in a row. inflation—beating pay rises may take some time to return. house of commons authorities are to look again at plans to silence the bongs of big ben for four years, during renovation work. it follows an outcry by mps and the prime minister. when parliament returns, the house of commons commission will consider the length of time that the bells will fall silent. during a visit to portsmouth to mrs may called for a urgent review of the plans. show we catch up with the weather prospects? —— shall we catch up with the weather prospects?
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it's it‘s been gusty wind wise but in england, we‘ve kept most of the sunshine today. this was the scene a few hours ago in barton in north yorkshire. this band of rain pushing forwards and the rain is going to get a bit heavy across the east of england. a milder nights. this rain band could be quite slow to clear away. it may well stay quite cloudy here. further north and west, the sunshine does come out and a number of showers working their way in. more sunshine between no showers, temperatures 19 celsius in glasgow and 20 celsius in belfast. northern ireland, scotland seeing some heavy rain. this time the heavy —— they
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will be heavy with hail and thunder. temperatures coming down. what about the weekend weather prospects? we will have to look at this. this is hurricane gert. this will bring some heavy rain into the north west of the uk during the second half of the weekend. the saturday, it‘s a familiar mix of sunshine and showers. cool and gusty, familiar mix of sunshine and showers. cooland gusty, out familiar mix of sunshine and showers. cool and gusty, out of the breeze not feeling too bad. but then that band of heavy rain. northern
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ireland, scotland etc. we will be keeping a close eye on that over at the weather centre in the next few days. that‘s your weather. tonight at six: brexit borders — the government wants business as usual between northern ireland and the republic. whether it‘s goods being traded or people on the move, no check points, no cameras — that‘s the vision. we do want to ensure that we don‘t see a return to the borders of the past, we don‘t see a return to a hard border. but would that leave a back doorfor eu migration through northern ireland? also tonight: i think there is blame on both sides. i think there is blame on both sides. here we go again —
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donald trump faces another barrage of criticism over his latest comments about the violence in virginia. the number of people in work is the highest ever, but some employers are struggling to get staff. we can‘t drive the growth as fast as we‘re able — bizarrely, not because of models or orders or finance, but people. and it‘s super—frustrating that we can‘t get the skilled
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